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  • Rare breed British Lop pig judging
  • Rare breed British Lop pig judging
  • Rare breed British Lop pig judging
  • Rare breed British Lop pig judging
  • Rare breed British Lop pig judging

The British Lop Pig society

The British Lop Pig Society was set up to represent the interests of owners and breeders of one of Britain's rarest breeds.

A child and a rare breed British Lop pig
The society aims to:
  • Support and encourage breeders of this rare breed pig.
  • Champion the breed, to promote awareness of the Lop as a viable retail product to breeders, butchers, chefs and producers.
  • Ensure the integrity of the breed through correct registering and monitoring of British Lop pigs.
  • Sustain the tradition of showing pigs at county shows, culminating in the ‘Lop of the Year’ title show.

Our Heritage

The British Lop Society is actively working to conserve, develop and market the Rare breed Lop Pig as a commercially viable breed. We offer a range of services and resources to owners, breeders and Society members.

The history of this great breed goes back beyond the first volume of the herd book in 1921. Those writing at that time had memories stretching back to the 1880's, nearly all based around the Cornwall/Devon border. It seems very likely that the breed’s development over time, in that relatively small geographic area, was by farmers wanting to turn grazing and by-products of other farming activities into saleable pig products. The result was a pig able to produce high quality pork, or easily be taken on to bacon weight without laying down too much fat. They were further developed over time to meet that need. Indeed that niche is still filled by the British Lop, as we know it today.

Pre-war years

The popularity of classes held at the May 1921 Devon County Show together with the high quality stock shown under the auspices of the then-named ‘The Long, White, Lop Eared Pig Society’ gave a great boost to the popularity of the pigs. Foundation stock must have still been being inspected at this time to allow publication of the first herd book.

There was a brief flirtation with the Welsh Pig Society in the late `1920’s- and although separate sections were maintained in the herd book, both sides quietly went their own way before the onset of the 1930’s. These years, before World War 2, were perhaps a high point for the breed with many bred pure, and registered predominately in the area of origin.

Post-war to present day

With their thriftiness and fecundity the Lops (although still not officially British Lops) should have been an ideal pig for food production during and after the War. Sadly, this was not to be as, in what now seems a very short-sighted move, the Ministry of Food urged farmers to concentrate on breeding other commercially viable white pigs such as the Large White and Landrace. The Lop suffered very much as a result. Few families, still prominent in the Society, managed to keep the breed going through what must have been a narrow gene pool.

The low period for the Society was during the 1960’s and 70’s with only 105 boars and 222 gilts registered in a ten year period. For comparison purposes that is about 1/10 of annual registrations today. There were 11 breeders maintaining the breed.

Four rare breed British Lop pigs

At long last, in 1969 the ‘National Long White Lop-Eared Pig’ become the British Lop. The British Lop Society was then the only independent pig society maintaining its own register and herd book. This independence gave a quick flexibility perhaps not found in larger bodies.

The foundation of the Rare Breed Survival Trust in 1975 undoubtedly assisted in exposing the very obvious attributes of the British Lop to a wider geographic market. Through time, herds have become established in most parts of the United Kingdom. Most are small, especially when compared to “commercial” pigs. These small herds are now conserving great genetics in an important way- who knows what the future hold in terms of traceability and quality.

This then is the heritage of the British Lop Society, not to hold us in some way in the 19th century in terms of production and product, but rather to know where and why this breed developed, taking it forward into the future while remaining rooted in its fecundity and thriftiness together with that long deep-bodied type of pig that so makes the British Lop stand out.

Our judges

Each year at our AGM, judges are appointed to regularly attend county shows nationwide to judge British Lop classes. The judges we appoint have vast experience not only with British Lop pigs, but often with other breeds too and we are very grateful for the service they provide.

R Nicholas
Crown Farm
Monmouth Road
Raglan
Gwent
07944 643016
E Edgar
Hertfordshire
01920 460957 / 07810 543403
Email: emma.v.edgar@gsk.com
B Upchurch
Greenway Farm
Steeple Morden
Royston
01763 852 193
M Todd
Smallicombe Farm
Northleigh
Colyton
Devon
01404 831 310
M Snell
Trotters
Mudford Sock
Yeovil
Somerset
01935 474 076
Ann Petch
East Hele
Kingsnympton
Umberleigh
Devon
01769 574 341
T Osborne
Hillcrest
St Briavels Common
Lydney
01594 530911
F Miller
Farm Five
The Moss
Whixall
Shropshire
01948 880 243
J Odlin
Providence Cottage
Halton Holgate
Spilsby
01790 754 840
K Matthews
East House
Wilton, Pickering
Yorkshire
01751 474780
G Kiddy
Solitaire Farm
Drove Road
Gamlingay
01767 650 884
D Harrison
Penllwyn
Carmel
Caernarfon
Gwynedd
01286 881 134
M Dobedoe
1 Station Avenue
Warwick
01926 490 109
J Flay
South View Farm
Holdings Lane
Capel
Cardiff
07974 867 412
W Gregory
Hollins Farm
West Lane
Burn
Yorkshire
01757 270 673
J Collings
Wenfork Farm
Treburley
Launceston
Cornwall
01579 370 503
J Cloke
Chadwick Farm
Chadwick Lane
Knowle
W. Midlands
01564 784 505

Our Committee

The committee represents an eclectic mix of people with experience in many different fields outside of the British Lop Society, each bringing something unique to the society, with the common aim of making this breed known to a much wider audience while conserving its authenticity. Please put yourself forward if you would like to be part of our committee by contacting our secretary – details below.

President
Derek Harrison
Penllwyn
Carmel
Caernarfon
Gwynedd
01286 881 134 / 07867 946 961
Email: derekpenllwyn@talktalk.net
Chairman / Publicity
Giles Eustice
Trevaskis Farm
12 Gwinear Road
Connor Downs
Cornwall
01209 713931 / 07876 210152
Email: gileseustice@trevaskisfarm.co.uk
Web: www.trevaskisfarm.co.uk
Vice-chair
Richard Lutwyche
Dryft Cottage
South Cerney
Cirencester
Gloucestershire
01285 869666
Email: rlutwyche@aol.com
Secretary
Celia Upchurch
Greenway Farm
Steeple Morden
Royston
Hertfordshire, SG8 0LX
Email: secretary@britishloppig.org.uk
Treasurer
Emma Edgar
Hertfordshire
01920 460957 / 07810 543403
Email: emma.v.edgar@gsk.com
Vice-President
John Hadley
Chesterton Fields Farm
Fosse Way
Caernarfon
Leamington Spa
01926 651158
COMMITTEE
Roger Sayle
COMMITTEE
Brian Upchurch
Greenway Farm
Steeple Morden
Royston
Hertfordshire, SG8 0LX
Email: celia.upchurch@tesco.net
COMMITTEE
Hayley Lake
4 Blacksmiths YD
Guist
Dereham
01362 683223
Email: hails74@hotmail.co.uk
COMMITTEE
Guy Kiddy
Solitaire Farm
Drove Road
Gamlingay, Sandy
Bedfordshire
01767 650884 / 07808 204363
Email: balshampigs@btinternet.com
COMMITTEE
Frank Miller
Farm Five
The Moss
Whixall
01948 880 243 / 07759 487 469
Email: f_miller@btconnect.com
Committee
Julian Collings
Wenfork Farm
Treburley
Launceston
Cornwall
01579 370503 / 0771 2625248
Email: emmacollings-x@hotmail.co.uk
Committee
John Flay
Committee
Dave Holden
Greenmoor Lane
Preston
Lancs
07912610452